Full Fleece.png

When your animal has enjoyed a full year's worth of growth, they are considered to be in "Full Fleece". 

With the exception of animals with a low body score, illness, or infirmity, combined with poor fleece growth (less than 1 inch of length on the body), alpacas in full fleece should be shorn annually in the spring.

Full Fleece
Standard.png

A standard full body cut leaves an alpaca nice and cool during the summer and allows for full regrowth of their fleece.

This cut trims the topknot and tail, and leaves about an inch or so of fibre on the lower legs to protect from flies. The rest of the fleece is shorn leaving a small amount of fleece for protection from the sun.

Standard, Full-Body cut
Naked.png

Similar to the standard cut, a full body cut may choose to leave the topknot and tail intact with just a trim (or may choose to shear these fully as with the rest of the body), while also shearing the lower legs fully.

This cut is a great way to see the full extent of leg conformation.

Full-Body cut
Stove Pipe + Trimmed Face.png

Some alpacas have full cheeks, and the owner may prefer to keep this fibre undisturbed to preserve the head style for the show ring. Trimming the cheeks allows for fresh fibre growth, without needing to constantly trim the head to prevent fibre blindness.

Stove-piping is where the leg is tapered at the knee, with only the tips removed, often for aesthetic purposes. Fuller legs may look more masculine, or provide extra protection from wrestling and flies well.

Trimmed Cheeks with Stove-piped Legs
Stove Pipe + Full Cheeks.png

Keeping the cheeks of a full faced animal intact is another alternative for the show ring, preserving the cria-like facial qualities. Keeping cheeks full is more labor intensive however, as regular trimming is necessary to ensure the animal does not become fibre blind, nor develop eye problems from overgrown fibres getting into the eyes.

Full Cheeks with Stove-piped Legs
Stove Pipe + Bobble Head.png

For some owners, the preference is to leave the head entire and untouched from the throat latch up.

 

For animals who are particularly head shy and will not tolerate the clippers safely near their head, this is a safe head-style option.

Bobble-Head with Stove-piped Legs
Neck.png

Leaving the neck and legs intact is a style option for owners who have animals who they would like to utilize the neck fibre, but whose animals do not grow enough neck fibre yearly to warrant it being shorn annually. This is also a popular cut with llama owners.

This cut cannot be used on animals intended for halter shows in Canada.

Partial Body Cut
Saddle.png

For alpacas who may need extra warmth in the winter with added fleece, or for many llama owners, a saddle cut allows the prime fibre to be collected and used, while providing adequate ventilation to the animal for the summer, and extra protection for the animal in the winter. 

This cut cannot be used on alpacas intended for halter shows in Canada.

Saddle Cut
Barrel.png

A barrel cut is very similar to a saddle cut, with the exception of the shoulders and hip fibre being left intact. This cut is popular with llama owners, and is useful for alpaca owners who have animals who need extra protection in the winter, but also need adequate ventilation to cool off during the summer.

This cut cannot be used on alpacas intended for halter shows in Canada.

Barrel Cut
Vent Cut 1.png

For alpacas who grow 1 inch or less of fleece yearly, or who may be in very poor body condition, ill, or otherwise compromised and may be at risk of hypothermia in the winter if fully shorn, a vent cut provides airflow over the thermal vents of an alpaca. This access allows easy skin access for hosing and other cooling procedures to help the animal stay comfortable in the summer and then warm in the winter. Animals with this cut should be shorn more extensively every other year to prevent overheating.

This cut cannot be used on alpacas intended for halter shows in Canada.

Vent Cut Style 1
Vent Cut 2.png

For alpacas who grow 1 inch or less of fleece yearly, or who may be in very poor body condition, ill, or otherwise compromised and may be at risk of hypothermia in the winter if fully shorn, a vent cut provides airflow over the thermal vents of an alpaca. This access allows easy skin access for hosing and other cooling procedures to help the animal stay comfortable in the summer and then warm in the winter. Animals with this cut should be shorn more extensively every other year to prevent overheating.

This cut cannot be used on alpacas intended for halter shows in Canada.

Vent Cut Style 2